The jewellery always has a conceptual basis in opposites, in a similar way to the printmaking.

The opposition in jewellery is between textures, shapes and colours. For example, an etched surface is placed next to a smooth surface, or a highly polished piece of silver next to a matt black piece of aluminium. Shapes are usually elegant, elongated and smooth. The circle or dot is used to balance a rectangle or square.

Working as a jeweller for several years on a part time basis, has resulted in a constant development of ideas. From an initial ‘love affair’ with the highly polished silver surface, I have developed the use of more alternative materials.The materials are often a stimulus for the ideas. One series of pieces evolved as a result of using off-cuts from printed aluminium, reclaimed from a commercial printer’s rejected plates.

In 2010 used an etching on silver process, embedding brass wire into silver and casting seeds and acorns in precious metal clay.
I like the shadowed effect that results from using an oxidising process, which is then cleaned off the surface to reveal the shining silver.

The themes are essentially natural, continuing to be about life, renewal, purpose, new beginnings and the microcosm echoing the macrocosm. The images are of leaves, flowers and seeds, which are essentially temporary objects. The found images and recycled metals, which are sometimes incorporated, re-enforce the concept of decay and renewal in nature.

Wearable and interesting: The jewellery is predominantly neck pieces and ear rings, although I have often made bracelets, rings and cuff links.

A recent experimental range, designed to avoid the excessive costs associated with the use of precious metals, makes extensive use of wood, plastic, antique tin and brass.

Some other recent developments (2012) in pure silver, are for sale at Tamara Lawsons's Gallery on Swan Street in Harrogate, near to the Art Gallery. The surface texture is the result of the application of extreme heat, which sometimes results in reticulation and sometimes in fusing. I have become interested in the left over scraps of silver in my recycling box. I think of the scraps as a metaphor for the left-over and "not required."

Materials: Silver 925 sterling.
Pure silver from precious metal clay.
Copper, brass, printed aluminium, anodised aluminium, gold.
Preserved French acorn shells and wood from the Judas Tree, which shows the burrowings of a wood eating grub or insect.

6_webtin2.jpg
       
6_web-jew-cro2.jpg
       
6_jew122.jpg
 Pure silver, designer wires   Tamara Lawson's Gallery 
6_web-palette2.jpg
       
6_jew128.jpg
 Tamara Lawson's Gallery     
6_etched-door.jpg
 etched copper doorway     
6_jew123.jpg
 Tamara Lawson's Gallery     
6_jew1212.jpg
 Ilkley Open Studios Oct 2013   Ilkley Open Studios 
6_web-jew1.jpg
 Pure silver from PMC     
6_jew126.jpg
 fused silver landscape     
6_jew-12-1.jpg
       
6_mini-jew-115.jpg
       
6_mini-jew-1112.jpg
       
6_mini-jew-116.jpg
       
6_mini-jew-119.jpg
       
6_jew1023.jpg
 cup of tea studs, from recycled tin     
6_webjew14.jpg
 Copper, silver and bead     
6_jew1025.jpg
 smoked copper and recycled tin     
6_jew1026.jpg
 copper, recycled tin and enamel     
6_jew1018.jpg
 enamel on copper with recycled tin     
6_jew1017.jpg
 oxidised etching, copper and tin     
6_jew1019.jpg
 double sided etched leaves     
6_jew1016.jpg
 oxidised etched silver     
6_jew1022.jpg
 oxidised etching on silver     
6_jew1021.jpg
 pierced and etched, made to order     
6_jew127.jpg
       
6_webjew16.jpg
 Cast silver acorns     
6_webjew-18.jpg
 Real french acorns     
6_webjew-6.jpg
 silver and etched copper